Thursday, December 29, 2016

Holiday hours - New Year's Eve 2016



May this New Year bring you Good Luck, Prosperity and Success. Happy New Year to All our friends!

Please be informed of holiday  hours in all our locations:
20282 NW 2nd Ave (441), Miami Gardens, Fl, 33169.
3251 NW 27th Ave, Miami, FL, 33142.
18200 South Dixie Hwy
Saturday Dec. 31st, New Year's Eve- Closed
Sunday Jan. 1st, New Year Day- Closed

We’ll be back to regular operations Monday Jan. 2nd,  Open from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm


Mr. Goma Team

Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Holiday Hours - Christmas 2016


Mr. Goma Team wishes you all a very Merry Christmas , may this day be shared with your loved ones. 

Please be informed of holiday  hours in all our locations:
20282 NW 2nd Ave (441), Miami Gardens, Fl, 33169.
3251 NW 27th Ave, Miami, FL, 33142.
18200 South Dixie Hwy
Saturday Dec. 24th, Christmas Eve- Closed
Sunday Dec. 25th, Christmas Day- Closed

We’ll be back to regular operations Monday Dec. 26th,  Open from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm

Monday, December 19, 2016

Continental Speeds up Evolution of AR Head-up Displays through Strategic Partnership with DigiLens

Babenhausen, Germany / Silicon Valley, USA. December 16, 2016. The international technology company Continental has entered into a strategic partnership with DigiLens Inc., a leader in holographic projection technology for application in automotive and consumer electronics. The partnership has been formed to develop ultra thin Augmented Reality Head-up Displays that will further enhance a wider market penetration in cars of different segments.



“With the breakthroughs we already have achieved in integrated optics, we are confident that together with Continental we will expand this technology to the automotive industry. Augmented Reality blends all relevant information provided by a Head-up Display, straight in front of the eyes of the driver. With that augmentation there is no reason not to keep your eyes focused on the road,“ said Jonathan Waldern, founder and CEO of DigiLens. “Together with Continental we will make roads safer and accelerate the adoption of Head-up Display technology.”




The technology will also ease drivers into accepting automated driving faster. Automated driving will require a holistic human machine interface that will lead to a safer and more intuitive driving experience with an enhanced joy of use. This is what the new type of display technology will clearly provide. With increased acceptance of Augmented Reality HUD drivers will feel secure in the knowledge of what the car actually sees and knows. In turn, driver confidence in automated driving will be enhanced significantly.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Driving Smart: Should you have winter tires?

It's December and cold temperatures are spreading across the country, but do you need winter tires? 
December is here and temperatures have dropped across the country. That means it’s time to put on your car’s winter tires. If you don’t have winter tires, perhaps you should consider it.

A few things make it a winter tire. First, they have large tread blocks and deep grooves for biting into snow. Second, they tend to have a squared off shoulder to dog into snow when cornering. The different rubber compound is the reason winter tires are not just for snow and ice. On dry pavement where all-season tires tend to be less effective, the winter tires really excel.
There are some significant downsides to winter tires however. They give you more grip at lower temperatures, typically between 40 and 50 degrees and below, but they have less grip than the alternatives above that level. That means come springtime you have to switch to all-season or summer tires. There’s the cost of the second set of tires, you typically pay to have them switched twice a year, and then there’s the issue of storing the second set. Four tires take up a good amount of room.
Winter tires are arguably most important for powerful performance cars. This type of car often comes with standard summer tires, the opposite of winter tires. They give you better grip when it’s warm, but are downright hazardous when it’s cold.

All-season tires are better than they’ve ever been and they’ll work for most people. But if you want the absolute best performance at all temperatures, winter tires and summer tires are the way to go.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

2017 Flying Car – Aeromobil 3.0

It is realistic that we will soon fly instead of driving cars. Precisely such a thing is possible with model 2017 Flying Car – Aeromobil 3.0. 

2017 FLYING CAR – AEROMOBIL 3.0 EXTERIOR DESIGN

Hard work and painstaking work will finally pay off. The company Aeromobil from Slovakia, plans to start in 2017 with the production of a flying car. This avant-garde product is really promising. Sci-Fi design will surpass the average sports car. The body is made from composite materials and other aircraft equipment. Sturdy but light enough. Below is placed a parachute ejection system, an advanced auto pilot and a safe landing in case of unforeseen problems.
                               

Monday, November 28, 2016

Nico Rosberg wins F1 title as Lewis Hamilton wins in Abu Dhabi

Nico Rosberg won his first Formula 1 world title despite Lewis Hamilton disobeying Mercedes orders not to back his team-mate into rivals.
Hamilton won the Abu Dhabi GP driving slowly in an attempt to bring other drivers into the battle, knowing he needed Rosberg to finish below third.
Hamilton was repeatedly told to speed up but told the team: "Let us race."
Rosberg came under pressure from Sebastian Vettel but held off the Ferrari driver to finish second.

Relief: Rosberg has been racing in Formula 1 for a decade before taking his first title

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Happy Thanks Giving Day!

We wish you fun, food, 
and most of all family,
Thanks for letting us serve you.



Monday, November 21, 2016

Pass the ball

We strongly believe that every child deserves to live and enjoy their childhood. Every child deserves the opportunity to become a person that contributes to society, a person with a bright future. Yet many of them struggle because of where they live, or their economic conditions. That's why we've came up with this initiative we've called "Pasa el bal√≥n" / ("Pass the ball") to collect second hand things like clothes, shoes, toys, colors, books, food etc; and give them to children in need; they will receive it happily -  and you'll be giving girls and boys the opportunity to play, enjoy and learn important values while playing.

When generous people like you contribute to this cause the present lives and the future of some kids can be changed.

Your gift will bring a smile to a kid






Clicking the link below you will see more information about this initiative. To contact us please feel free to write to ​liseth@haztuvida.com or call to (305)278-4632 Jean Paul-



All donations will be received in our store at 18200 South Dixie Hwy Miami, FL, 33157 Ph: (305)278-4632

Thanks in advance for your contribution!



Monday, November 14, 2016

Tesla's Solar Roof Almost Ready for Distribution, How Much Will It Cost?



Billionaire and Tesla CEO Elon Musk recently launched the new Tesla Solar Roofs using a 'Desperate Housewives' set as a model house. The new Tesla roofs are equipped with solar panels are not just designed to harness solar power and store them in Power Wall, but the new solar roof is also designed to replace existing roofs.

The innovative solar roofs are said to be stronger than traditional roofing system. The solar panels are built in within the roofing panels so that the roofing itself will serve as the solar panels and vice versa. During the launch, Powerwall 2 and Powerpack 2 were also unveiled. The solar roofs will directly work with Tesla's home-based Powerwall.

Although it is not available on the market yet, it is looking good for Tesla as a lot of manufacturers and industry players are praising the new building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) solar roofs. This is the reason why a lot of industry players and the consumers as well are looking out for the would-be price point of Tesla's innovative solar roofs.

Typical solar shingles are already expensive, to begin with like CertainTeed, Suntegra and Atlanis. This is due to the high cost of materials and installation cost. But Musk argued during the launch that in the long run, installing solar roofs would be beneficial environmentally and economically.
The solar roofs are composed of a 6-inch solar cell. The economical advantage can be calculated depending on how powerful the solar cells and the kilowatt-generating power or solar cells on the roof combined.

Tesla's solar roofs are also designed to replace the typical type of roofing materials. On the onset, it will be of course, a bit more expensive than the regular ones especially if the home owner will choose to replace the whole roofing system with its solar counterpart. But Musk had also given that a thought. The Tesla CEO said anyone could choose only parts of their roofs to be replaced with the ones with solar cells and still keep some of the typical roofing materials. This is in respect to existing homes and the owner's aesthetic preferences.

In an educated guess, Brian Cinnamon of Green Tech Media expects that the Tesla solar roof to cost about $15,000 for a set that is capable of producing 9,000 kilowatt-hours per year.

But until the solar roofs roll out in the market, no one can tell for sure how much will the solar roof cost. Tesla's acquision of SolarCity paved the way for the production of Solar Roofs that is considered an integral part of Musk's environmental agenda mentioned in his 'Tesla Master Plan Part 2'.

Monday, November 7, 2016

Top 10 Quietest Tires of 2016



Tires are manufactured according to specific standards in order to facilitate driving in any type of weather on almost any type of surface. Not many tires, unfortunately, are supposed to provide a quiet driving experience because there isn’t an industry standard for such a thing to begin with.

Many people, however, prefer to do their driving as quietly as possible and understandably so. If you’re one of those people, you’re probably wondering just how much of a difference quiet tires can make and how would you go about getting some?

This is a list of the ten quietest tires in the world right now, tires that are guaranteed to bring a bit of serenity to your driving experience without taking anything away from their adherence and durability.

Goodyear Fortera HL Radial Tire



The Fortera HL isn’t exactly designed to be quiet, but it is nevertheless. This being said, you shouldn’t expect it to retain its quiet nature when driving at considerable speed, but you should expect a smooth ride otherwise. It is also a very durable tire, coming with a 60,000 miles warranty and a speed rating of T-118 MPH. Also, it has a serrated black stripe and a load index of 107.

General AltiMAX RT All-Season Tire



Thanks to its acoustic modulations sound technology (AMST), the AltiMAX RT is quiet than your average tire by quite a bit. Combined with its reactive contour technology, this makes the AltiMAX not only quiet but responsive at the same time


Goodyear Wrangler ArmorTrac Radial Tire



Goodyear is known for making high-quality tires and it was only natural for some of them to be quiet as well. This being said, do not expect the Wrangler ArmorTrac to be as quiet as tires that were specifically designed this way. You can, however, rely on the Wrangler ArmorTrac to be a lot quieter than most tires for pickup trucks / light trucks being sold nowadays.

Bridgestone Dueler H/T 684 II All-Season Radial Tire




This all-season tire for SUV’s, light trucks, and crossovers is designed to provide outstanding wet weather traction while being extremely quiet at the same time. This doesn’t mean that it isn’t quiet most of the time, because it is. It just means that due to its rounded casting profile and specially designed notches, these tires will allow you to experience a pretty smooth and quiet ride in bad weather.

Dunlop Grandtrek AT20 All-Season Tire



Made with dimensionally stable polyester that ensures its uniformity, this particular type of tire is a lot smoother that other tires in its class. It features a VersaLoad technology that maintains the tire’s stability and wear in a variety of conditions while its variable pitch tread blocks ensure that you will experience a very quiet ride. Furthermore, its powerful adherence allows it to be used as a reliable traction tire.

Goodyear Eagle LS Radial Tire



Goodyear’s Eagle LS Radial Tire features four circumferential grooves for increased wet traction, special tread block sequence for enhanced handling, and premium sidewall styling for a more contemporary appearance. Its special tread block sequence also reduces tread noise while making the overall driving experience much smoother. Its reliable traction under almost any conditions allows it to be used in any weather while its adherence is way above normal.

Cooper Discoverer H/T Plus All-Season Tire



Using a non-directional tread design, the Discovered tire from Cooper provides a much quieter driving experience overall but especially when driving in a straight line. Intended for SUV’s, this tire can be used by light trucks or crossovers just as well. It has a rubber rim protector and a rounded mold profile that balances traction and tread life. Furthermore, its overall rigid, yet adherent nature makes it an all-season tire.


Hankook Optimo H724 All-Season Tire



This all-season tire from Hankook uses a center rib block that improves handling and stability while changing direction. Its pitch design technology drastically reduces tire noise, even when driving at a fast speed. Its jointless full cover improves its overall durability and brake performance while its high-hardness bead filler ensures its resistance in any weather. 



Continental ExtremeContact DWS All-Season Tire




Continental’s ExtremeContact DWS all-season tire uses easy-to-read tread wear level indicators for greater comfort, improved water evacuation for improved wet handling, and a design that ensures enhanced overall performance in dry conditions. Speaking of design, this particular tire is designed to provide increased traction in light snow conditions and a much smoother, more quiet performance when driving in a wet environment.



Continental ContiProContact SSR Run-Flat All-Season Tire


This all-season passenger tire from Continental uses a central rib that reduces thread pattern noise levels quite a lot, ensuring a much smoother ride overall. It has a run-flat ability for greater mobility in case of a puncture, optimized sipes with defined radius for improved stability, and a circumferential groove for better water evacuation and breaking on wet surfaces. Overall, the ContiProContact SSR from Continental is not only one of the quietest tires on the market but one of the most stable, reliable, and durable tires money can buy.

Monday, October 31, 2016

Understanding How Brakes Work

Besides Shorter Stopping Distance, What Else Would You Improve about the Way Your Brakes Perform?
·         Reduce the amount of ugly black brake dust that appears on your wheels?
·         Reduce or eliminate that annoying squeal as you pull up to the toll booth?
·         Reduce the amount of pedal pressure required to bring your vehicle to a stop?
·         Improve the ability to stop at the maximum level even after repetitive stops?
Brakes work by converting kinetic energy (forward motion) into thermal energy (heat). The friction between the stationary brake pad and rotating disk or drum as it slides past the pad convert the motion of the wheel and tire into heat, much the way rubbing your hands together on a cold day will warm them up. Bringing your car to a stop generates enough heat at each wheel to boil a liter of water in about 7 seconds. Brake temperatures can reach around 500°F during normal everyday use, and can reach up to 1000°F under heavy or repetitive braking.

The brake disk or drum is designed to work like a heat sink, and absorbs as much as 80% of the heat generated during stopping. Fortunately, it also makes a good radiator, cooling as it spins through the air on the way to the next stop.
The front brakes do most of the work as the vehicle's weight pushes forward while stopping. Therefore, many vehicles are equipped with disc brakes on the front axle and drum brakes on the rear. A disc brake's superior performance is largely due to its ability to generate friction as the brake calipers force the pads to clamp against the rotors. The brake rotors are cleaned and dried by the brake pads dragging across them and the entire brake system is exposed to the air for efficient cooling. The advantages of rear drum brakes are lower cost and the ability to easily integrate a mechanical emergency/parking brake system.

Most Original Equipment brake pads are made of many different compounds, and try to achieve a compromise between stopping power, low noise, dusting and long wear. Gone is asbestos, now replaced with modern friction materials.

Monday, October 24, 2016

OEM -- original equipment manufacturer

Vehicle manufacturers understand that there is little reason to spend millions of dollars developing the ride and handling qualities of a new vehicle's suspension if they are going to omit integrating the influence of its Original Equipment tires. This has resulted in either completely new tire designs or fine-tuned versions of existing designs being engineered for every new car and light truck from the beginning of the vehicle's development process.
There was a time in America when it was thought that the only reasons a vehicle manufacturer chose Original Equipment tires were "how wide were the whitewalls" and "which manufacturer would sell their bias ply tires for the lowest price." Well even if that had been true, times have changed and neither whitewalls nor cheap bias ply tires are used on vehicles today.
Part of the reason for this is because tire comfort and tire performance directly correlate with the driver's overall vehicle satisfaction. Original Equipment tires play an integral role in achieving the vehicle's desired comfort and performance capabilities, and greatly influence the vehicle's personality. And as vehicles have evolved, so have OE tires. For the most part, today's vehicles are lighter, more fuel-efficient and more responsive than those built a decade ago. This has caused corresponding reductions in tire weight and rolling resistance, while enhancing the tire's handling capabilities.
A tire's characteristics can be represented graphically in a "spider" chart (see below). These charts provide a visual means of presenting multiple performance characteristics to allow direct comparison of an existing tire's capabilities (usually established at the 100 level as a baseline) to the targets and/or realized performance levels for a new tire.
While the tire manufacturer's ultimate goal is to develop technology that allows them to expand the new tire's entire comfort and performance envelope in all directions compared to the original tire, frequently they are only able to expand the tire's capabilities in several areas without causing compromises that would result in less performance in other areas. This type of analysis allows confirmation of the accomplished improvements and any resulting compromises.



Starting from the same original tire would result in identifying different goals for a tire intended for a luxury coupe vs. a tire intended for a true sports car. Which is the better tire? In reality, neither of them is better; but they are both different. Most importantly, both would be tuned to meet the desired personality of the car. However, if misapplied, the driver would experience a loss of performance if the luxury coupe tire was installed on the sports car, or a loss of comfort if the sports car tire were installed on the luxury coupe.
Maintaining high customer satisfaction is key to vehicle and tire manufacturers alike. Vehicle manufacturers benefit from higher vehicle satisfaction ratings, and tire manufacturers that have high levels of driver satisfaction also have the highest percentage of drivers who report that they intend to buy that same tire brand in the future. Among year-one owners, more than 60 percent of the drivers on OE Michelin report that they plan to repurchase Michelin tires in the future, the highest repurchase intention of all tire brands.
Additionally, the vehicle manufacturers have learned that if the driver is satisfied with their tires they are also likely to be satisfied with their vehicle, increasing their intent to repurchase the same brand of vehicle in the future.



Monday, October 10, 2016

Goodyear develops concept tires for Lexus UX concept car

Lexus has introduced its UX concept car, fitted with Goodyear Urban Crossover concept tires.

The spokes of the rim flow smoothly into the sidewall design of the tire, creating one unique feature consistent with the rest of the car.
The sections of the sidewall, seamlessly integrated in the wheel, give the tire its urban crossover look, while the tread pattern gives the tire a dynamic appearance. The tire’s design is created using Goodyear’s hi-tech laser carving technique.

It incorporates state-of-the-art features including Goodyear’s sound comfort technology, which uses an open-cell polyurethane foam element attached to the inner surface of the tire. This technology dampens the tire cavity resonance sound peak that is generated when the tire rolls over a surface, enabling the vehicle’s cabin to be extremely quiet.

This has been combined with the company’s chip-in-tire technology, which sends vital information to the car’s onboard computer, enhancing the stability and performance of the car when cornering and braking.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Closed due to weather





Please be informed that due to bad weather all our stores will be closed tomorrow. We'll be back to our regular operations Friday 7th.


Mr.Goma Team

Monday, October 3, 2016

For a hundred years, General Motors was defined by its brands: Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick, GMC, Cadillac; Saturn, Saab, and Hummer later joined the portfolio.

But the lead-up to the financial crisis and the Great Recession, driving GM into bankruptcy, saw Pontiac, Oldsmobile, and Saturn vanish, while Hummer and Saab faded away.

This was actually a plus for GM, as supporting all those brands had become a drag on the business. Since coming out of bankruptcy, however, GM has discovered that it can develop new brands without having to promote them and market them as such.

On Friday, the automaker's Buick division announced that it had created a new sub-brand, "Avenir." That's the French world for "future," and it takes it cue from a concept car that Buick unveiled in 2015.



"Through the first half of 2016, Buick has been the industry's fastest-growing major international brand, and Avenir is key to future growth and delivering on the high expectations of new customers coming to our showrooms," Duncan Aldred, Buick's boss, said in a statement.

"Avenir will be Buick's signature. The highest expression of the luxury experiences we're delivering now and in the future."


The carmaker says Avenir vehicles "will add distinct touches to Buick's timeless, sculpted designs, including a three-dimensional mesh grille, large-diameter wheels, and unique trim finishes." Interiors will also be upgraded.

The inspiration for this brand-within-a-brand idea at Buick has come from its stablemate GMC. Dealers often sell both brands, and the Denali designation for GMC vehicles has become a de facto premium nameplate, with sales prices approaching those traditionally captured by better-known luxury brands such as Range Rover.



Creating Avenir as a sub-brand also avoids GM's perpetual problem of brand management. The automaker has always struggled with a business model that required brands to capture customers in different market segments, but that also eventually sees the lines between those brands blur.

It's probably better to think of Avenir as a sort of super-trim-level, with premium pricing attached. The move also proves decisively that Buick is back. GM considered killing the brand — the original GM marque — as the Great Recession loomed. GM's China business depended on Buick, however, so the brand had to be fixed at home. The arrival of a new crossover SUV, Enclave, rescued sales at an opportune moment.


The creation of Avenir is a good indication that Buick will be around a lot longer.

Monday, September 26, 2016

Conti, General all-terrain tires debut

Continental Tires the Americas’ newest all-terrain light truck lines — the Continental TerrainContact A/T and General Grabber X3 — are now available in dealers’ showrooms throughout North  America.

The debut of the two tires marks Continental’s entry into the all-terrain segment with a Continental-branded product and the expansion of Grabber product line into the mud-terrain segment, Conti said.
According to Conti, the TerrainContact tires incorporate the tire maker’s “TractionPlus” technology, which helps to provide durable performance through dirt and gravel while maintaining a quiet, comfortable ride on pavement. TractionPlus features an open pattern and large stable blocks, while the patented +Saline helps to provide traction in wet conditions.

“This tire is the perfect balance of on- and off-road performance for light truck and SUV owners,” Travis Roffler, director of marketing for Continental Tire said.
“While this is a new segment for Continental Tire, we are confident that the hours and miles we’ve invested in testing this tire will pay off. Whether dry, wet, pavement, dirt, gravel, or grass, we believe consumers will be extremely happy with the off-road durability and traction while also experiencing a quiet, comfortable ride on-road.”

The TerrainContact A/T also features traction grooves that provide gripping teeth inside the groove to lock in snow for improved grip, while the full-depth sipes also help with traction on snow and ice.
The TerrainContact A/T is available in 20 sizes in 16- to 22-inch wheel diameters with a 245 to 285 millimeter widths and 45 to 75 series. Additionally, there will be 15 LT metric sizes, ranging from 16- to 20-inch wheel diameter with a 235-315 width and 60-80 series.

The General Grabber X3 is so named because it takes extreme terrain to the power of three, offering “extreme” performance in mud with an optimal void and self-cleaning pattern, in dirt with enhanced grip and stability and on rock surfaces with adhesion and cut/chip resistance.

The X3 features a high-void tread-pattern design, evacuation channels and alternating shoulder scoops for mud traction; block chamfers, traction notches and stone bumpers for dirt performance; and multi-angle gripping edges, deflection ribs, and sidewall protection lugs for grip on rock surfaces.

The X3 will offer 42 SKUs, including 17 with the Grabber line’s signature smooth red sidewall lettering. The lineup includes 13 flotation sizes in 31- to 37-inch outside diameters in rim diameters from 15 to 20 inches. There also are 16 LT metric sizes from 255 to 315 millimeter widths in 16- to 20-inch rim diameters.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Tips for buying used tires

Evaluate Tire tread depth
First you should determine how much life the tires have left in them by looking at the depth of the tire tread. Using a gauge you can determine EXACTLY how much is left.

Read the Tire Age
It is important to check the age of the. You can check the age of a tire based on the writing on the side of the tire. Knowing how much tread is left, you can calculate approximately how long of a life the tire has remaining based on its age, remaining tread depth and your driving habits.
Know the UTQG Rating

The Uniform Tire Quality Grade Standards (UTQG) rating, often called the Treadwear Rating, is another important aspect to look at. The lower the number, the softer the tire and the quicker it will wear out. Most race cars use a UTQG of less than 100. The most economical, long lasting tires are around 450-600 UTQG. If you’re looking at a tire with a UTQC under 200, expect it to wear quickly. It will have tons of grip and be a very high performance tire, but that performance comes at the cost of durability. Anything between 200-400 is a relatively high performance tire that will last a normal lifespan. Anything 450-600 should last a very long time, all things considered equal, and be a great choice for durability, but likely at the cost of performance.

Monday, September 12, 2016

Get The Most Out Of That Set Of Tires

Your tires are a pretty big investment. Even with the cheapest set of tires, you’re going to be spending upwards of $400 on the tires, mounting, balancing, disposal fees and taxes. Since you laid down that kind of money, doesn’t it just make sense to make sure you get the most miles possible out of them?


Here’s some advice on long tire life:

• Regularly check your tire pressure. This one is really, really important. Underinflated tires will wear
unevenly and reduce your fuel economy due to increased rolling resistance. That increased rolling resistance also means more heat, which will break down the tires’ internal structure and shorten their lives. All it takes to shorten a tire’s service life by 25 percent is for it to be underinflated by 5-6 lbs.
• Rotate your tires regularly. No vehicle has even weight distribution from front to rear. The engine puts more weight over the front wheels; in addition, the front tires will wear differently as the vehicle’s weight and momentum shifts to the front while braking. The front tires are also subjected to different forces while cornering. As a result, it’s important to rotate the tires, shifting their positions on the vehicle to even out wear. Rotations should be done every 6,000 miles or so; many drivers have the rotation performed at the same time as an oil change, since the vehicle’s already up on a lift anyway.
• Check your wheel alignment. A vehicle that’s in need of a wheel alignment will wear the front tires unevenly, as the out-of-spec wheel tries to drag the car in a different direction. That’s what also causes the persistent pull to one side while driving in a straight line. Be alert to the signs of poor wheel alignment, and have an alignment performed if necessary.

• Drive sensibly. That means no hard cornering and no wheel spin while taking off. 

Monday, September 5, 2016

History of Labor Day



Observed on the first Monday in September, Labor Day pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers. It was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century and became a federal holiday in 1894. Labor Day also symbolizes the end of summer for many Americans, and is celebrated with parties, parades and athletic events.
Labor Day, an annual celebration of workers and their achievements, originated during one of American labor history’s most dismal chapters. In the late 1800s, at the height of the Industrial Revolution in the United States, the average American worked 12-hour days and seven-day weeks in order to eke out a basic living. Despite restrictions in some states, children as young as 5 or 6 toiled in mills, factories and mines across the country, earning a fraction of their adult counterparts’ wages. People of all ages, particularly the very poor and recent immigrants, often faced extremely unsafe working conditions, with insufficient access to fresh air, sanitary facilities and breaks.
As manufacturing increasingly supplanted agriculture as the wellspring of American employment, labor unions, which had first appeared in the late 18th century, grew more prominent and vocal. They began organizing strikes and rallies to protest poor conditions and compel employers to renegotiate hours and pay. Many of these events turned violent during this period, including the infamous Haymarket Riot of 1886, in which several Chicago policemen and workers were killed. Others gave rise to longstanding traditions: On September 5, 1882, 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march from City Hall to Union Square in New York City, holding the first Labor Day parade in U.S. history.
The idea of a “workingmen’s holiday,” celebrated on the first Monday in September, caught on in other industrial centers across the country, and many states passed legislation recognizing it.Congress would not legalize the holiday until 12 years later, when a watershed moment in American labor history brought workers’ rights squarely into the public’s view. On May 11, 1894, employees of the Pullman Palace Car Company in Chicago went on strike to protest wage cuts and the firing of union representatives.
On June 26, the American Railroad Union, led by Eugene V. Debs, called for a boycott of all Pullman railway cars, crippling railroad traffic nationwide. To break the strike, the federal government dispatched troops to Chicago, unleashing a wave of riots that resulted in the deaths of more than a dozen workers. In the wake of this massive unrest and in an attempt to repair ties with American workers, Congress passed an act making Labor Day a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.More than a century later, the true founder of Labor Day has yet to be identified.

Many credit Peter J. McGuire, cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, while others have suggested that Matthew Maguire, a secretary of the Central Labor Union, first proposed the holiday.Labor Day is still celebrated in cities and towns across the United States with parades, picnics, barbecues, fireworks displays and other public gatherings. For many Americans, particularly children and young adults, it represents the end of the summer and the start of the back-to-school season.

History of Labor Day

Observed on the first Monday in September, Labor Day pays tribute to the contributions and achievements of American workers. It was created by the labor movement in the late 19th century and became a federal holiday in 1894. Labor Day also symbolizes the end of summer for many Americans, and is celebrated with parties, parades and athletic events.
Labor Day, an annual celebration of workers and their achievements, originated during one of American labor history’s most dismal chapters. In the late 1800s, at the height of the Industrial Revolution in the United States, the average American worked 12-hour days and seven-day weeks in order to eke out a basic living. Despite restrictions in some states, children as young as 5 or 6 toiled in mills, factories and mines across the country, earning a fraction of their adult counterparts’ wages. People of all ages, particularly the very poor and recent immigrants, often faced extremely unsafe working conditions, with insufficient access to fresh air, sanitary facilities and breaks.
As manufacturing increasingly supplanted agriculture as the wellspring of American employment, labor unions, which had first appeared in the late 18th century, grew more prominent and vocal. They began organizing strikes and rallies to protest poor conditions and compel employers to renegotiate hours and pay. Many of these events turned violent during this period, including the infamous Haymarket Riot of 1886, in which several Chicago policemen and workers were killed. Others gave rise to longstanding traditions: On September 5, 1882, 10,000 workers took unpaid time off to march from City Hall to Union Square in New York City, holding the first Labor Day parade in U.S. history.
The idea of a “workingmen’s holiday,” celebrated on the first Monday in September, caught on in other industrial centers across the country, and many states passed legislation recognizing it.Congress would not legalize the holiday until 12 years later, when a watershed moment in American labor history brought workers’ rights squarely into the public’s view. On May 11, 1894, employees of the Pullman Palace Car Company in Chicago went on strike to protest wage cuts and the firing of union representatives.
On June 26, the American Railroad Union, led by Eugene V. Debs, called for a boycott of all Pullman railway cars, crippling railroad traffic nationwide. To break the strike, the federal government dispatched troops to Chicago, unleashing a wave of riots that resulted in the deaths of more than a dozen workers. In the wake of this massive unrest and in an attempt to repair ties with American workers, Congress passed an act making Labor Day a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.More than a century later, the true founder of Labor Day has yet to be identified.

Many credit Peter J. McGuire, cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, while others have suggested that Matthew Maguire, a secretary of the Central Labor Union, first proposed the holiday.Labor Day is still celebrated in cities and towns across the United States with parades, picnics, barbecues, fireworks displays and other public gatherings. For many Americans, particularly children and young adults, it represents the end of the summer and the start of the back-to-school season.

Friday, September 2, 2016

Labor Day 2016

We will be closed on Monday, September 5th in honor of the Labor Day holiday. We will return to our regular hours on Tuesday, September 6th.



Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Labor Day 2016

We will be closed on Monday, September 5th in honor of the Labor Day holiday. We will return to our regular hours on Tuesday, September 6th.


Monday, August 29, 2016

Tips for Handling a Tire Blowout

For many drivers, there is nothing more frightening or potentially dangerous than a tire blowout at almost any speed. While the number of tire-related crashes has dropped dramatically since 2008, when all new vehicles were required to have automatic tire pressure monitoring systems, these numbers still remain high. The stats do not lie, as tire blowouts and flats result in nearly 11,000 collisions and 200 fatalities each year.1


With all the advances in safety standards and technology, why are tire blowouts still such a significant safety issue? One reason may be that since blowouts are now a rarer occurrence, when they do happen, drivers are less prepared to handle them and react properly. When a tire blows out, it can take about ¼ second before your ride suddenly becomes a struggle to avoid an auto accident. How you react can make all the difference in how the situation resolves itself. The first step is staying calm and in control of your vehicle.

What Does a Tire Blowout Sound Like?
Expect to hear three key sounds that may vary depending on your specific situation. First, you may hear a loud boom or bang of the tire popping reverberating through your car. You may then hear a whooshing sound or the sound of the air quickly escaping from the tire, and finally, a repeated flapping or flopping of the deflated tire hitting the road.

What Does a Tire Blowout Feel Like?
When a tire explodes at speed, first you will feel the vehicle slow down, then it will pull strongly to the left or right depending on which tire burst.2 If it was a front tire that burst, you will feel the force mostly within the steering of your vehicle. With a rear tire, you will feel it more in the seat or body of the car. Whether the blowout occurred in the front or back, your response should be the same in either situation.

How to Drive Through a Tire Blowout
According to the National Safety Council and other safety experts, there are some important tips and best practices to remember if you experience a tire blowout.
  • Keep a firm grip on the steering wheel.
  • Do not slam on the brakes.
  • Let your car slow down gradually.
  • Pull to the side of the road once you have slowed to a safe speed.
  • Activate your emergency flashers.3
What to Do After a Tire Blowout
After a blowout, only exit your vehicle if you are certain you are safely off the road and out of harm’s way. Turn your emergency flashers on to alert other drivers, and put out reflective cones or triangles if you have them. If it is not safe to change the tire where you are, or you are unsure how, call for roadside assistance.
Also keep in mind that a spare is only recommended for emergencies and should not be driven for long distances or at high speeds. Take the time to read your owner’s manual to learn where your spare tire and necessary tools are located. Your manual may also provide instructions on how to change a flat tire. It is a good idea to be familiar with these procedures before you get stuck on the side of the road.
How to Prevent a Tire Blowout

The good news is that many tire blowouts are preventable with the proper effort and attention. Most occur from May through October when the road surface is the hottest, resulting from an underinflated tire, excessively worn treads, or an overloaded vehicle. A simple, routine inspection of your tires to check for slow leaks, wear and tear, and proper pressure is important. Keeping your load light, within your vehicle manufacturer’s recommendations (found in the same spot as the recommended tire pressure), can help too.4